Recent News

Posted on 2012-11-08 07:21.

Corals under attack by toxic seaweed do what anyone might do when threatened – they call for help. A study reported this week in the journal Science shows that threatened corals send signals to fish “bodyguards” that quickly respond to trim back the noxious alga.

Posted on 2012-10-31 08:11.

Yingying Zeng, a graduate student in the School of Biology, is the lead author on a new paper that describes the complete structure of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV). This is the first model for the structure of any virus that specifies the position of every single atom. Zeng combined high-resolution data from x-ray crystallography, chemical data on the structure of the RNA genome, and knowledge-based molecular modeling methods to develop her model.

Posted on 2012-10-24 10:50.

Most of us gaze in wonder at how clouds of all different shapes and sizes form and vaporize across the beautiful October Atlanta sky. Few of us think about bacteria playing a role in this process. This is not the case for Natasha DeLeon-Rodriguez, a School of Biology graduate student in the lab of Kostas Konstantinidis (http://enve-omics.gatech.edu/).

Posted on 2012-10-22 11:43.

Earlier this month a team of undergraduates brought home a silver medal in the 2012 International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition. iGEM is considered the premiere undergraduate synthetic biology competition where teams design, construct and analyze novel biological systems to perform new functions in living cells.

Posted on 2012-10-16 04:42.

New Georgia Tech research shows that cell stiffness could be a valuable clue for doctors as they search for and treat cancerous cells before they’re able to spread. The findings, which are published in the journal PLoS One, found that highly metastatic ovarian cancer cells are several times softer than less metastatic ovarian cancer cells.

Posted on 2012-10-04 08:36.

Dr. Joshua Weitz (Associate Professor, School of Biology) has been awarded a grant from the Program in Biological Oceanography on "Understanding the Effects of Complex Phage-Bacteria Infection Networks on Ocean Ecosystems". The award provides over $470,000 over 4 years to study the interaction between viruses and bacteria in ocean ecosystems.

Posted on 2012-10-04 06:55.

New Georgia Tech research shows that cell stiffness could be a valuable clue for doctors as they search for and treat cancerous cells before they’re able to spread. The findings, which are published in the journal PLoS One, found that highly metastatic ovarian cancer cells are several times softer than less metastatic ovarian cancer cells.

Posted on 2012-09-07 03:05.

At the 2012 annual meeting of the International Society of Chemical Ecology in Vilnius, Lithuania, Professor Julia Kubanek delivered an invited lecture sponsored by the society. This award is made each year to a chemical ecologist whose recent work is at the forefront of the field, and is named after the late Milt Silverstein and John Simeone, pioneers of this field and co-founders of the Journal of Chemical Ecology.  Professor Kubanek presented "War in the Plankton: Sublethal and reciprocal impacts of red tide algae on competing phytoplankton", co-authored by Georgia Tech current and former students Kelsey Poulson-Ellestad, Jessie Roy, Robert Drew Sieg, Christina Jones, Emily Prince, Tracey Myers, as well as former GT postdoctoral researcher Clare Redshaw, and collaborators Facundo Fernandez (GT), Brook Nunn (University of Washington), Jerome Naar (University of North Carolina at Wilmington), and Mark Viant and Jon Byrne (University of Birmingham UK).  

Posted on 2012-08-23 08:38.

In research published in September’s American Journal of Human Genetics, Soojin Yi looked at brain samples of each species. She found that differences in certain DNA modifications, called methylation, may contribute to phenotypic changes. The results also hint that DNA methylation plays an important role for some disease-related phenotypes in humans, including cancer and autism.

Posted on 2012-08-07 08:36.

Professor John McDonald is studying micro RNAs (miRNAs), a class of small RNAs that interact with messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that have been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. McDonald’s lab placed two different miRNAs (MiR-7 and MiR-128) into ovarian cancer cells and watched how they affected the gene system.

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